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Hickory Run State Park




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General Information

Hickory Run State Park
Copyright: - Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks
Hickory Run State Park
Description - The park is part of an area acquired in a treaty with American Indians. From 1790 to 1835 the Commonwealth sold warrants, for approximately 400 acres, to persons willing to pay for registration and survey work. Robert Morris, hailed as the "financier of the American Revolution," and signer of both the Declaration of Independence and Constitution purchased warrants in the Hickory Run area.

The National Park Service with the help of the Works Progress Administration built the Hickory Run Recreation Demonstration Area during the 1930's. In 1945, this outstanding recreation area was given to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and became Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field is a true relic of the past. This area is a National Natural Landmark and State Park Natural Area. Some of the boulders measure as much as 26 feet long.

Hickory Run State Park offers an exciting variety of recreational opportunities during every season of the year including family camping, group camping, picnicking and an elaborate 40 mile trail network. Winter sports include snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, ice skating and sledding. A very large portion of the park is open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established Pennsylvania Game Commission seasons.

Diverse habitats and forest types, extensive wild areas and unique geological formations makes Hickory Run an excellent outdoor classroom. From March to November, the seasonal park environmental education specialist conducts various hand-on activities, guided walks and presentations on the natural and historical resources for school groups, scouts, civic organizations and the general public.

Attractions - The park is part of an area acquired in a treaty with American Indians. From 1790 to 1835 the Commonwealth sold warrants, for approximately 400 acres, to persons willing to pay for registration and survey work.

Robert Morris, hailed as the "financier of the American Revolution," and signer of both the Declaration of Independence and Constitution purchased warrants in the Hickory Run area.

By 1880, the region had been completely cut over. Hemlocks were cut and peeled of the bark, which was used for tanning. White pines were sawed at local mills operated by water power. The remains of several mills are still visible along Hickory Run and Sand Spring Run. On nearly every stream in this vicinity, dams were built to supply the power. Several of these dams exist today.

Colonel Harry C. Trexler, an Allentown businessman, purchased several tracts of land in the area of what is now the park. After his death, trustees of his estate sold 12,908 acres to the National Park Service.

The Hickory Run Recreation Demonstration Area was built by the National Park Service with the help of the Works Progress Administration during the 1930's. In 1945, this outstanding recreation area was given to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and became Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field is a true relic of the past. This area is a National Natural Landmark and State Park Natural Area. It has remained relatively unchanged for more than 20,000 years. The Boulder Field appears striking because of its flatness and absence of vegetation over the large area of 400 feet by 1,800 feet. Some of the boulders measure as much as 26 feet long.

Recreation - Hickory Run State Park offers an exciting variety of recreational opportunities during every season of the year including: family camping, group camping, picnicking and an elaborate 40 mile trail network. Winter sports include: snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, ice skating and sledding.

A very large portion of the park is open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established Pennsylvania Game Commission seasons, with the exception of: 1) hunting of woodchucks also known as groundhogs is prohibited and 2) dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day to March 31 in designated hunting areas. Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations are in effect for all activities in the park. White-tailed deer, turkey, black bear and gray squirrels are common game species. In addition, the snowshoe hare is quite common in the park. State Game Lands number 40, 129 and 141, which adjoin the park provide additional areas open to hunting. The park is used by fishermen, campers, hikers, and picnickers and EXTREME CAUTION with firearms must be exercised at all times.

Diverse habitats and forest types, extensive wild areas and unique geological formations makes Hickory Run an excellent outdoor classroom. From March to November, the seasonal park environmental education specialist conducts various hand-on activities, guided walks and presentations on the natural and historical resources for school groups, scouts, civic organizations and the general public.

Climate - Pennsylvania generally has a moist climate with cold winters and warm summers. The Hickory Run State Park area has cold winter months with temperatures averaging around 24 to 28 degrees Fahrenheit (-4 to -2 degrees Celsius). The area's average summer temperatures range around 72 to 74 degrees Fahrenheit (22 to 23 Celsius).

Location - The park is easily reached from several locations. From Interstate 80 take Exit 41 at the Hickory Run State Park Exit and drive east on PA 534 for 6 miles. From the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, take Exit 35 and drive west on PA Route 940 for 3 miles then turn east on PA Route 534 for 6 miles. The park is within a two or three hour drive from Harrisburg, Philadelphia and New York City and one hour from Allentown, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.


Current Conditions & Trip Reports

Trip Reports:
Add your own trip Report! Newly re-released feature. One of the most popular features on Wildernet, trip reports allow you to share your experiences with others. This is an invaluable resource for determining what to expect on your outdoor adventure, so please participate! To prevent spamming, you must be a registered user of Wildernet in order to submit a trip report

Filed By: Gibson family (Shickshinny, PA)
Number of People Encountered: 25-50 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Highly
Report: Our family has been camping, swimming, fishing, and hiking here for 20 years. It's a beautiful park with nice scenery, a nice sandy beach for swimming though a bit cold as it is in the Pocono Mountains, and our favorite place for relaxing. The facilities are great and the staff are all friendly including the park rangers, the cleaning staff for the bath facilities, and the staff in the camp store. Just a great place to visit! We've met many people who, like us, come year after year to camp there. We know the rules about packing everything away at night due to black bears around, but I forgot once and that's all it took...left the koolaide thermos on the table which was under our brand new screen house; mama bear and cub had fun toppling the screen house and trying to figure out how to get into the koolaid jug, not to mention licking the cups I also left on the table that had koolaid in them in the evening! What an interesting night! We've seen a bear pick up a very large cooler with one paw and smack it on the ground to break it open so she could take out the mayo jar, unscrew the lid, and lick that thing clean! Don't ever doubt that you need to always put your food stuff away at night! Still, those bears don't really care about you, they're just checkin out to see who didn't listen to the rangers!

Filed By: Steve (Langhorne, PA)
Number of People Encountered: 0-10 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Neutral
Report: Hiked these trails for years. OK considering how close it is, but tame in comparison to the big woods of North-Central PA. Not much old-growth, and can be very crowded during the weekend. Decent during the weekdays.

Filed By: Scott (Phoenixville, PA)
Number of People Encountered: 0-10 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Highly
Report: The trip to the park with my two kids (9th & 1st graders)was fun filled fishing, a boulder field visit, more fishing and and a quite drive through the wilderness. Hickory run lake was our favorite spot. So still and picture perfect, very few people and nice brook trout. Plenty to see and do in just our three hour visit (we saw only a small portion of the park). Doing it again in October for the foliage and peace. Would like to see a couple more small signs on the road to boulder field for the first time visitors. thx.

Filed By: michele (bethlehem, pa)
Number of People Encountered: 0-10 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Highly
Report: Hiked with my dog down the Fireline trail. Beautiful vistas and very peaceful trail (moderate difficulty, lots of up and down hills). Crossed over at the bottom to the Hickory Run Trail to loop around but a short ways in saw either a very very large bobcat or a mountain lion (it saw us too, so I didn't stick around to look too closely...scared the you-know-what out of me), so turned around and went back the way we came! Park ranger and game commission deputy say there are reports of mountain lions but nothing confirmed. Great place to hike but recommend you do not go alone.

Number of People Encountered: 25-50 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Highly
Report: Visited the park from 7/9-7/11, with Husband, brother-in-law and his wife and their dog. Hiked the Skyline Trail on 7/10, beautiful, we were the only people on the trail.

Filed By: Irene
Number of People Encountered: 11-25 ppl
Recommend to a Friend: Highly
Report: we have been camping here for years. kids have a ball. prefer modern sites over primative. the diner in white haven(can't think of the name)for breakfast.great food, great prices, CASH ONLY!!!

View more Trip Reports.


More Information

Contact Information:
Hickory Run State Park, R.R. 1, Box 81 , White Haven, PA, 18661-9712, Phone: 570-443-0400
, hickoryrun@dcnr.state.pa.us

Additional Information:
Pennsylvania State Parks and Forests - Pennsylvania is known for producing some of the most valuable hardwood timber in the world. The 2.1 million acres of state forest land are protected from fire, destructive insects and diseases while offering a beautiful recreation environment for the visitor. Pennsylvania's State Park system offers visitors year-round recreational enjoyment as well. Amenities include: camping, picnicking, hiking, an assortment of winter sports and the viewing of the natural biological diversity and ecosystems found within the Commonwealth.
Pocono Mountains / Endless Mountains Area - The Pocono Mountains abound in natural wonders. The Glens Natural Area has 22 named waterfalls in a scenic gorge with old growth timber. You can also try whitewater rafting on the Lehigh River.

Links:
Pennsylvania State Parks - Official agency website

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